Category Archives: II/19a Seleucid

Antigonids, Seleucus & Rome

The Christmas and New Year period provided an opportunity for my son and I to play a series of long overdue Ancient games. During the 2020 Christmas break we refought a series of historic Punic Wars battles using DBA this year however we opted for a different theme. In particular the Wars of the Antigonids and Roman campaigns in Cisalpine Gaul.

Starting with the Antigonids we fought a series of games involving Antigonus, Demetrius and finally Antigonus Gonatas against the Seleucids. The first engagement was fought between Antigonus & Seleucus I Nicator. In the centre the phalangites of both commanders clashed, while on the flanks elephants, light troops & mounted were locked in combat.

Above, Seleucus engages Antigonus. In this engagement Antigonus fought with the phalanx causing some confusion for Seleucus, who expected him to be with the xystophori. Finally, Antigonus gained success.

Now the baton was passed to Demetrius who again faced Selecus. Unlike Antigonus Demetrius determined not to use pachyderms and as a result his command and control improved.

Above, the armies just prior to clashing with the Seleucids on the right. Like his father, Demetrius secured victory over Seleucus.

In our third game Demetrius was replaced by Antigonus Gonatas who now faced Antiochus I. Soter, with an even more disparate army Soter put up a determined fight. However again the Seleucids failed to secure a victory. Below, the armies engaged with the Antigonids advancing from the left.

The miniatures above are all 15mm figures and mostly from Tin Soldier supplemented by a few Xyston for variation and, in the case of two stands of Celts, Corvus Belli.

Next we moved to the conflict between Rome & Gaul, specifically that set between the Punic Wars. Some four engagements were fought over two evenings.

Above and below photos of two of the games. While the Romans fielded a similar army in each engagement the Gauls tried various combinations.

Of the four battles three resulted in victories for the Polybian Romans while just one ended in a Gallic victory. The Gauls are Corvus Belli while the Romans are mostly from Essex.

With the holidays ending our final game, the eighth in the series, was set in the Second Punic War. In particular, Polybian Romans engaged against Carthaginians.

Above, on one flank a stalemate persisted while in the centre and other flank, illustrated below, both armies were heavily engaged.

Like the previous engagements the final result went to the wire, with a narrow victory achieved by the Romans.

In all a fine series of games which for us illustrated the strengths of DBA. In particular games involving historical opponents, with very plausible results, all resolved in a limited time frame.

Campaigning with Seleucus Nicator

The shifting alliances of Alexander’s Successors are best described as complex. However, with the recent defeat of the Antigonids it was now that Lysimachus and Seleucus fought the brief yet critical campaign in 300 BC. It comprised two great battles.

The first battle was in the Spring of 300 BC when the cunning Lysimachus moved rapidly against the Seleucids. Seleucus offered battle on an open plain where he deployed traditionally. His mounted were mostly concentrated on his right while extending his phalanx with contingents of pachyderms which he reasoned would otherwise be countered too easily by his enemies Thracians. Yet soon after deploying Seleucus was faced with the reality that the cunning Lysimachus had weighted his deployment against the Seleucid right. Further, he now advanced generally in echelon with his left leading and his right withdrawn.

Above the Seleucid right is overlapped by the advancing Lysimachid left. Seleucid light cavalry, not shown, provided a degree of protection.

Simultaneously Lysimachid light infantry are thrown forward to slow the Seleucid centre. Yet, these were unsupported and countered. Now the Seleucid centre advanced. Below, the Lysimachid centre comes under pressure as the Seleucid elephants press forward.

The battle now hung in the balance as Seleucus sought advantage in the centre while fighting a delaying action on his right. However, with his line under pressure Seleucus ordered forward his companions who, with great valour, drove back the treacherous Greek. Yet these manoeuvres had created a hole in the Seleucid line which Lysimachus was able to exploit. Soon the Seleucid right collapsed with Seleucus himself narrowly escaping death. Lysimachus had secured a decisive victory.

Yet, Seleucus was not deterred. By the Summer of 300 BC Seleucus, having reformed his army, struck at Lysimachus. This time Lysimachus was caught relatively unprepared and as the Seleucid host advanced Lysimachus deployed his army with his right resting on the walled town Colophon.

Effectively ignoring Colophon and it’s high walls Seleucus massed his elephants and phalanx in the centre and his mounted on his right before ordering an advance.

Above, the Seleucids advance with a number of pachyderms supported by phalangites. Below, a view from behind the Lysimachid lines.

Lysimachus now dithered first moving his companions near the walls of the city in one of his overly complex plans. Finally he realised the threat posed by unfolding disaster that would soon envelope his left. Yet, repositioning his xystophori was almost impossible and while he desperately tried first his left and then his centre would collapse.

Above, a view of the centre, while below the Lysimachid left is about to collapse.

With this stunning victory Seleucus had bought the campaign of 300 BC to an end. Yet victory can be fleeting and even as this campaign season is complete we can be sure Lysimachus will be plotting his revenge and another campaign will not be far away.

As to the miniatures the Seleucids are mostly 15mm miniatures from Tin Soldier’s ranges. The Lysimachid forces in contrast are from Essex Miniatures. The battles form part of a four game series fought between myself and my son during a weekend visit.